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The Latest Pull

COMIC REVIEW: MOON KNIGHT #10

Marvel Comics

Writer: Brian Wood

Artist: Greg Smallwood, Jordie Bellaire

Price:  $3.99

 

 

Continuing from last month’s cliffhanger, “Moon Knight #10” follows the mysterious and unnamed doctor as she assumes the identity of Khonshu’s knight of vengeance in her quest for, you guessed it, vengeance. Gloria Roza, a member of the United Nations Security, is also roped into the doctor’s crusade after a few trippy scenes akin to the hypnosis session of the previous issue.

 

Because Marc Spector, our main character, is mostly absent this issue, I couldn’t help but feel like this was just filler for what’s to come. And to be honest, this issue’s conclusion failed to live up to last week’s dramatic cliffhanger. The story was a tired cliché; the villain corrupts an agent of justice into doing their bidding. Despite these negatives, this issue does give us a better look at Khonshu, as the doctor’s version of Moon Knight seems to be more of a direct avatar of the god than Spector’s. With the Smallwood/Bellaire team’s gritty artwork and Wood’s stellar writing, the god of the moon has never been creepier.

 

 

Despite the exhausted cop cliché, complete with a dead honest-cop father, Wood still manages to create a compelling and believable character that could have just as easily been flat for her purposes in the plot. And Smallwood’s line work and Bellaire’s shading give an all new life to Khonshu’s character that Shelvey’s didn’t have.

Something that I appreciate about this issue and Wood’s run in general is the consistent story throughout this arc. While Ellis’ run was mostly made up of one-shots with one connecting story within, the second arc has had an underlying plot the entire time. I’ve always been more of a fan of the serial formula in stories rather than episodic, and although Ellis’ run did give us insight on Spector’s personality and backstory, Wood’s run has done a lot in expounding on Spector’s dissociative-identity disorder and his character as a whole.

 

 

While this issue may have felt a tad unnecessary as a whole, I won’t say it was unenjoyable to read. Looking at this issue by itself, it had a decent story, strong writing, and excellent art. And with its conclusion, I’m very excited to see where the story will progress from here. “Moon Knight” is still one of the most exciting new comics of the year, and with the current arc wrapping up in two issues, I only see big things in store for Spector from here on out.

Marvel Comics Writer: Brian Wood Artist: Greg Smallwood, Jordie Bellaire Price:  $3.99     Continuing from last month’s cliffhanger, "Moon Knight #10" follows the mysterious and unnamed doctor as she assumes the identity of Khonshu’s knight of vengeance in her quest for, you guessed it, vengeance. Gloria Roza, a member of the United Nations Security, is also roped into the doctor’s crusade after a few trippy scenes akin to the hypnosis session of the previous issue.   Because Marc Spector, our main character, is mostly absent this issue, I couldn’t help but feel like this was just filler for what’s to come. And to be honest, this issue’s conclusion failed to live up to last week’s dramatic cliffhanger. The story was a tired cliché; the villain corrupts an agent of justice into doing their bidding. Despite these negatives, this issue does give us a better look at Khonshu, as the doctor’s version of Moon Knight seems to be more of a direct avatar of the god than Spector’s. With the Smallwood/Bellaire team’s gritty artwork and Wood’s stellar writing, the god of the moon has never been creepier.     Despite the exhausted cop cliché, complete with a dead honest-cop father, Wood still manages to create a compelling and believable character that could have just as easily been flat for her purposes in the plot. And Smallwood’s line work and Bellaire’s shading give an all new life to Khonshu’s character that Shelvey’s didn’t have. Something that I appreciate about this issue and Wood’s run in general is the consistent story throughout this arc. While Ellis’ run was mostly made up of one-shots with one connecting story within, the second arc has had an underlying plot the entire time. I’ve always been more of a fan of the serial formula in stories rather than episodic, and although Ellis’ run did give us insight on Spector’s personality and backstory, Wood’s run has done a lot in expounding on Spector’s dissociative-identity disorder and his character as a whole.     While this issue may have felt a tad unnecessary as a whole, I won’t say it was unenjoyable to read. Looking at this issue by itself, it had a decent story, strong writing, and excellent art. And with its conclusion, I’m very excited to see where the story will progress from here. "Moon Knight" is still one of the most exciting new comics of the year, and with the current arc wrapping up in two issues, I only see big things in store for Spector from here on out.
Story - 6
Art - 9
Characters - 7

7.3

While not this series' strongest installment, Moon Knight #10 still offers a good read.

User Rating: 4.28 ( 4 votes)
7