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The Latest Pull

COMIC REVIEW: POSTAL #1

Image Comics

Writers: Bryan Hill, Matt Hawkins

Artist: Isaac Goodhart

Price: $3.99

 

 

This week, Image brings us a new book from writers Bryan Hill and Matt Hawkins. I’m unfamiliar with both of their previous works but I was excited to check this book out, because it’s a first issue and because it’s an Image book. After reading through it a few times, however, I found myself to be fairly disappointed with the comic as a whole.

 

 

Postal has a pretty interesting premise: it takes place in the fictional town of Eden, Wyoming, a town inhabited and run by former criminals. Crime is strictly forbidden, and any offenders are dealt with severely. As the mayor puts it, “You don’t move here for a second chance. You move here for your last chance.” However, even with this interesting backdrop the plot was so un-engaging that I struggled to get through the read.

 

 

Mark, our protagonist, has Asperger’s syndrome but this character trait feels like more of a crutch to get away with terrible writing than an actual redeeming quality. He is overly-analytical and awkward with people (a typical trait of those with Asperger’s) but he doesn’t feel real. This comic is supposed to be a mystery so I can see where this trait could be useful, but I just couldn’t find myself being engaged by his character or story. But it’s not just Mark I have a problem with. Most of the characters feel more like lazily-written stereotypes than people; at one point, I actually cringed at the dialogue between Mark and a Native American character. The art didn’t wow me all that much either, and looked like the work of an amateur. There was little detail in the backgrounds or character models, and a lot of the images seemed to lack depth and looked 2-D at times.

 

 

My biggest problem with the book is the pacing; nothing happens in the comic until the very last page. There are characters introduced, and there is some action and conflict, but none of it feels all that important once the final page comes along. The comic is advertised as a mystery, but that element doesn’t appear until late in the story, and the rest of the book is so boring that I almost couldn’t make it there. Even the final twist that leads to the mystery isn’t all that interesting, and I can honestly say that I don’t care to read the next issue.

This issue felt like too much exposition on characters and settings I didn’t care about. While I understand that first issues are all about introductions, this issue did nothing to make me interested in the story it wanted to tell. Perhaps later on this comic will pick up, but just going off this issue, I can’t say I care to follow the series.

Image Comics Writers: Bryan Hill, Matt Hawkins Artist: Isaac Goodhart Price: $3.99     This week, Image brings us a new book from writers Bryan Hill and Matt Hawkins. I’m unfamiliar with both of their previous works but I was excited to check this book out, because it’s a first issue and because it’s an Image book. After reading through it a few times, however, I found myself to be fairly disappointed with the comic as a whole.     Postal has a pretty interesting premise: it takes place in the fictional town of Eden, Wyoming, a town inhabited and run by former criminals. Crime is strictly forbidden, and any offenders are dealt with severely. As the mayor puts it, “You don’t move here for a second chance. You move here for your last chance.” However, even with this interesting backdrop the plot was so un-engaging that I struggled to get through the read.     Mark, our protagonist, has Asperger's syndrome but this character trait feels like more of a crutch to get away with terrible writing than an actual redeeming quality. He is overly-analytical and awkward with people (a typical trait of those with Asperger’s) but he doesn't feel real. This comic is supposed to be a mystery so I can see where this trait could be useful, but I just couldn’t find myself being engaged by his character or story. But it’s not just Mark I have a problem with. Most of the characters feel more like lazily-written stereotypes than people; at one point, I actually cringed at the dialogue between Mark and a Native American character. The art didn’t wow me all that much either, and looked like the work of an amateur. There was little detail in the backgrounds or character models, and a lot of the images seemed to lack depth and looked 2-D at times.     My biggest problem with the book is the pacing; nothing happens in the comic until the very last page. There are characters introduced, and there is some action and conflict, but none of it feels all that important once the final page comes along. The comic is advertised as a mystery, but that element doesn’t appear until late in the story, and the rest of the book is so boring that I almost couldn’t make it there. Even the final twist that leads to the mystery isn’t all that interesting, and I can honestly say that I don’t care to read the next issue. This issue felt like too much exposition on characters and settings I didn’t care about. While I understand that first issues are all about introductions, this issue did nothing to make me interested in the story it wanted to tell. Perhaps later on this comic will pick up, but just going off this issue, I can’t say I care to follow the series.
Story - 6
Characters - 4
Art - 5

5

Postal #1 did little to pique my interest.

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