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The Latest Pull

Comic Review: Nova #28

Marvel Comics

Writer: Gerry Duggan

Artist: David Baldeon

Price: $3.99

 

 

Nova #28 is the eighth installment of “The Black Vortex,” a story that has been unfolding in the pages of All-New X-Men, Guardians of the Galaxy, and their respective tie-ins. The story revolves around the titular Black Vortex, an ancient alien artifact that will grant phenomenal cosmic power to anyone who submits to it. So far, the Vortex has bestowed its power upon Beast, Angel, Gamora, and Ronan the Accuser. Now, the Vortex is being pursued by both Peter Quill’s father J’son (who has inexplicably been renamed “Mr. Knife”) as well as Thane, the son of Thanos.

 

 

It is the newest Nova, Sam Alexander, however, who currently possesses the much-sought-after Black Vortex. After escaping an epic space battle with the Vortex, Sam stashes it in the safest place he knows – under a sheet in his bedroom. Sam is tempted by the Vortex to submit to it amid promises that it will allow him to find his missing father. Before he can do so, however, Sam’s family is visited by The Collector, who, somewhat predictably, is also seeking to acquire the rare artifact. Ultimately, Sam decides that the best course of action is to track down Star-Lord and give the Vortex to him. When he arrives on Spartax, however, Sam finds more than he bargained for.

 

 

“The Black Vortex” as a whole has been a surprisingly good story, despite the fact that it had all the markings of a throwaway story, being published on the eve of the line-altering “Secret Wars.” The storytelling has been solid throughout the event, and this issue is no different. The light tone Gerry Duggan has established during his run on Nova persists in spite of the dire circumstances facing Sam, and the trademark humor that has been a highlight of the book is present as well. The artistic style is very tone-appropriate, the characters are well-drawn, and David Curiel’s colors create a bright, vibrant galactic landscape that breathes life into the story.

The only downfall this book suffers is that it is only worth reading if you have been reading the rest of “The Black Vortex” event, a problem that plagues almost every tie-in and crossover. While Nova readers who have not been picking up the rest of the issues may find themselves a bit lost in the story, the signature artistic style and humor that have made this book enjoyable should make them feel right at home.

Marvel Comics Writer: Gerry Duggan Artist: David Baldeon Price: $3.99     Nova #28 is the eighth installment of "The Black Vortex," a story that has been unfolding in the pages of All-New X-Men, Guardians of the Galaxy, and their respective tie-ins. The story revolves around the titular Black Vortex, an ancient alien artifact that will grant phenomenal cosmic power to anyone who submits to it. So far, the Vortex has bestowed its power upon Beast, Angel, Gamora, and Ronan the Accuser. Now, the Vortex is being pursued by both Peter Quill's father J'son (who has inexplicably been renamed "Mr. Knife") as well as Thane, the son of Thanos.     It is the newest Nova, Sam Alexander, however, who currently possesses the much-sought-after Black Vortex. After escaping an epic space battle with the Vortex, Sam stashes it in the safest place he knows - under a sheet in his bedroom. Sam is tempted by the Vortex to submit to it amid promises that it will allow him to find his missing father. Before he can do so, however, Sam's family is visited by The Collector, who, somewhat predictably, is also seeking to acquire the rare artifact. Ultimately, Sam decides that the best course of action is to track down Star-Lord and give the Vortex to him. When he arrives on Spartax, however, Sam finds more than he bargained for.     "The Black Vortex" as a whole has been a surprisingly good story, despite the fact that it had all the markings of a throwaway story, being published on the eve of the line-altering "Secret Wars." The storytelling has been solid throughout the event, and this issue is no different. The light tone Gerry Duggan has established during his run on Nova persists in spite of the dire circumstances facing Sam, and the trademark humor that has been a highlight of the book is present as well. The artistic style is very tone-appropriate, the characters are well-drawn, and David Curiel's colors create a bright, vibrant galactic landscape that breathes life into the story. The only downfall this book suffers is that it is only worth reading if you have been reading the rest of "The Black Vortex" event, a problem that plagues almost every tie-in and crossover. While Nova readers who have not been picking up the rest of the issues may find themselves a bit lost in the story, the signature artistic style and humor that have made this book enjoyable should make them feel right at home.
Story - 7
Characters - 7.5
Art - 7.5

7.3

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