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The Latest Pull

COMIC REVIEW: OLD MAN LOGAN #1

Marvel Comics

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis

Artist: Andrea Sorrentino

Price: $4.99

 

 

It’s been about six months since the Death of Wolverine, an event that left everyone speculating when Marvel would resurrect their most famous mutant. Secret Wars seems to be the sort of paradigm-shifting event that would afford Marvel to do big things to reshape their universe, such as bringing characters back from the dead.

When Old Man Logan was announced and Bendis’s name was attached to it, many started predicting that the older, grizzled version of Logan created by Mark Millar and Steve McNiven in 2008 would be the Wolverine we get in the Marvel universe following Secret Wars. As part of the generation who was introduced to the character almost exclusively through the 1994 X-Men animated series, I wanted to believe that we’d get the Wolverine from X-Men ’92  going forward, but after reading the first issue of Bendis’s Old Man Logan, I’m fairly convinced that we’ll be seeing this version of Logan for at least a while, and I’m perfectly okay with that.

 

 

Bendis perfectly captures the character of Old Man Logan, a take-no-prisoners badass that isn’t afraid to dole out punishment to those he deems deserving. In this issue, Logan’s target is a man in an Iron Man mask named Gladiator, who Logan alleges has been stealing and trafficking children. Logan meets Gladiator and two of his goons (who happen to be wearing Daredevil costumes), and quickly dispenses with them in gruesome fashion, but not before chastising one of the goons for disgracing the Daredevil costume without even knowing what it means. The fight scene here is amazing, and Andrea Sorrentino does a masterful job of showing movement and setting the blood-soaked spaghetti western tone that makes this book great. Fans of Wolverine will appreciate this take on Wolverine, one that is not afraid to get some blood on his claws and does not apologize for dolling out large helpings of justice.

 

 

On Wolverine’s way home, he finds an Ultron head, one that could not have belonged to the Ultron that used to inhabit his world. After a brief stop at the home he shares with Dani Cage, daughter of Luke Cage and Jessica Jones, and the infant son of Bruce Banner, Logan sets out in search of answers as to the origin of the Ultron head from fellow mutant Emma Frost. Emma informs him that she had done battle with a group of outlaws known as The Punishers, and was fatally wounded. Before she died, however, she informs Logan that the Ultron head had to have come from over the wall, which separates this domain from the other regions in Battleworld, prompting an amazing moment when Logan decides to scale the wall.

 

Simply put, this book was amazing. Bendis is at his best here. The world he builds is desolate but fascinating. The characters are dynamic and intriguing, and the plot moves at just the right pace to keep the reader engaged. Andrea Sorrentino’s art is gorgeous as well, and she does an impeccable job of capturing the essence of the characters and the universe they inhabit. This is the strongest Secret Wars tie-in issue I’ve read yet, and it’s definitely worth the $4.99 price tag.

Marvel Comics Writer: Brian Michael Bendis Artist: Andrea Sorrentino Price: $4.99     It's been about six months since the Death of Wolverine, an event that left everyone speculating when Marvel would resurrect their most famous mutant. Secret Wars seems to be the sort of paradigm-shifting event that would afford Marvel to do big things to reshape their universe, such as bringing characters back from the dead. When Old Man Logan was announced and Bendis’s name was attached to it, many started predicting that the older, grizzled version of Logan created by Mark Millar and Steve McNiven in 2008 would be the Wolverine we get in the Marvel universe following Secret Wars. As part of the generation who was introduced to the character almost exclusively through the 1994 X-Men animated series, I wanted to believe that we’d get the Wolverine from X-Men ’92  going forward, but after reading the first issue of Bendis’s Old Man Logan, I’m fairly convinced that we’ll be seeing this version of Logan for at least a while, and I’m perfectly okay with that.     Bendis perfectly captures the character of Old Man Logan, a take-no-prisoners badass that isn’t afraid to dole out punishment to those he deems deserving. In this issue, Logan’s target is a man in an Iron Man mask named Gladiator, who Logan alleges has been stealing and trafficking children. Logan meets Gladiator and two of his goons (who happen to be wearing Daredevil costumes), and quickly dispenses with them in gruesome fashion, but not before chastising one of the goons for disgracing the Daredevil costume without even knowing what it means. The fight scene here is amazing, and Andrea Sorrentino does a masterful job of showing movement and setting the blood-soaked spaghetti western tone that makes this book great. Fans of Wolverine will appreciate this take on Wolverine, one that is not afraid to get some blood on his claws and does not apologize for dolling out large helpings of justice.     On Wolverine's way home, he finds an Ultron head, one that could not have belonged to the Ultron that used to inhabit his world. After a brief stop at the home he shares with Dani Cage, daughter of Luke Cage and Jessica Jones, and the infant son of Bruce Banner, Logan sets out in search of answers as to the origin of the Ultron head from fellow mutant Emma Frost. Emma informs him that she had done battle with a group of outlaws known as The Punishers, and was fatally wounded. Before she died, however, she informs Logan that the Ultron head had to have come from over the wall, which separates this domain from the other regions in Battleworld, prompting an amazing moment when Logan decides to scale the wall.   Simply put, this book was amazing. Bendis is at his best here. The world he builds is desolate but fascinating. The characters are dynamic and intriguing, and the plot moves at just the right pace to keep the…
Story - 9
Art - 9.5
Characters - 9.5

9.3

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