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The Latest Pull

COMIC REVIEW: DAREDEVIL #18

Marvel Comics

Storytellers: Mark Waid & Chris Samnee

Colorist: Matthew Wilson

Price: $3.99

 

Today, we say goodbye to one of the most consistent, enjoyable and entertaining runs on any character in recent memory. Over the course of the last four years and more than 40 issues, we’ve witnessed Daredevil rise from a B-list superhero to one of Marvel’s most important thanks to the sure writing of Mark Waid as well as spectacular art from the likes of Chris Samnee and more. While the final issue may not pack quite the punch some might be looking for, it leaves enough doors open for future writers as well as reinforces what has made Mark Waid’s run so magical.

 

Issue #18 picks up with Ikari seemingly killed by the Shroud as Daredevil struggles to find a way to save his own life as well as the lives of Foggy Nelson, Kristen McDuffie and Julia Carpenter. Without spoiling the plot, what I appreciated most about this issue was how it allowed Foggy to shine. Often portrayed as a bumbling sidekick, Waid always managed to treat the character with respect. This final issue truly shows how important Matthew Murdock’s loved ones are to his role as Daredevil, as well as his constant struggle with depression.

Having Matt reveal his identity, publicly, was a bold move, and one I did not think Mark Waid would continue to adhere to, admittedly. Foggy’s dialogue, however, serves as a stark contrast to stories like Identity Crisis, making the case that secrets only protect those who keep them. Seeing how strong Matt’s allies have been throughout this recent run, it’s hard to argue with him.

 

Chris Samnee’s style, once again, captures the tone of the book perfectly, presenting some of the most intense fight scenes among any recent issue of Daredevil. Thanks to superb coloring from Matthew Wilson as well, this last issue is one of the best looking yet.

Not everything shined in this book, however. Some moments seemed rushed, especially when dealing with Matt’s emotional state. The use of Julia Carpenter also left something to be desired, with absolutely no explanation regarding her previous role as a super powered individual. If you are at all unfamiliar with her character, some dialogue might leave you puzzled.

Minor gripes aside, Mark Waid’s finale to his four year Daredevil Saga is still worthy of the cover price and your time. If you’ve been following since Waid first took over, it’ll be a bittersweet read for sure. Thankfully we have another highly capable writer, Charles Soule, picking up the character later this year, and plenty of reason to revisit Mark Waid’s incredible run again and again.

Marvel Comics Storytellers: Mark Waid & Chris Samnee Colorist: Matthew Wilson Price: $3.99   Today, we say goodbye to one of the most consistent, enjoyable and entertaining runs on any character in recent memory. Over the course of the last four years and more than 40 issues, we’ve witnessed Daredevil rise from a B-list superhero to one of Marvel’s most important thanks to the sure writing of Mark Waid as well as spectacular art from the likes of Chris Samnee and more. While the final issue may not pack quite the punch some might be looking for, it leaves enough doors open for future writers as well as reinforces what has made Mark Waid’s run so magical.   Issue #18 picks up with Ikari seemingly killed by the Shroud as Daredevil struggles to find a way to save his own life as well as the lives of Foggy Nelson, Kristen McDuffie and Julia Carpenter. Without spoiling the plot, what I appreciated most about this issue was how it allowed Foggy to shine. Often portrayed as a bumbling sidekick, Waid always managed to treat the character with respect. This final issue truly shows how important Matthew Murdock’s loved ones are to his role as Daredevil, as well as his constant struggle with depression. Having Matt reveal his identity, publicly, was a bold move, and one I did not think Mark Waid would continue to adhere to, admittedly. Foggy’s dialogue, however, serves as a stark contrast to stories like Identity Crisis, making the case that secrets only protect those who keep them. Seeing how strong Matt’s allies have been throughout this recent run, it’s hard to argue with him.   Chris Samnee’s style, once again, captures the tone of the book perfectly, presenting some of the most intense fight scenes among any recent issue of Daredevil. Thanks to superb coloring from Matthew Wilson as well, this last issue is one of the best looking yet. Not everything shined in this book, however. Some moments seemed rushed, especially when dealing with Matt’s emotional state. The use of Julia Carpenter also left something to be desired, with absolutely no explanation regarding her previous role as a super powered individual. If you are at all unfamiliar with her character, some dialogue might leave you puzzled. Minor gripes aside, Mark Waid’s finale to his four year Daredevil Saga is still worthy of the cover price and your time. If you’ve been following since Waid first took over, it’ll be a bittersweet read for sure. Thankfully we have another highly capable writer, Charles Soule, picking up the character later this year, and plenty of reason to revisit Mark Waid’s incredible run again and again.
Art - 8.8
Story - 8.2
Characters - 9

8.7

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