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The Latest Pull

COMIC REVIEW: POWER UP #3

BOOM! Studios

Writer: Kate Leth

Artist: Matt Cummings

Price: $3.99

 

 

 

Kate Leth and Matt Cumming’s creator-owned miniseries Power Up is finally started to find its stride with a solid third chapter that is well paced, rewarding, and simply funny.

 

Leth’s writing is charming as ever, with short lines of dialogue that do just enough to help the story progress and further develop the characters. Amie in particular is still easy to relate with, as someone who just wants to live her life in the way that most young adults seem to desire nowadays. Of course, Amie isn’t the only lovable character. The protagonist is surrounded by a wonderful cast of heroes whom we learn quite a bit about. Kevin’s origin story in particular is very satisfying, despite how short it is, highlighted by a beautifully flashy transformation.

 

 

These flashy moments are a huge part of what makes this series so entertaining. Fans of Sailor Moon will find a lot of familiar panels in this book, with plenty of colorful, flashy scenes full of transformations and magical energy. The action scenes are cute and fun to look at, and are mostly entertaining. They don’t progress as smoothly as they could, as there seems to be quite a bit of missed action between the panels, but this doesn’t dramatically hurt the series’ pacing. The villain of this issue has a creative design, and on top of providing some explanation on the circumstances of the characters’ powers, he also serves the purpose of showing the reader how strong Silas the fish actually is (which is very unfortunate for the antagonist).

 

 

Matt Cummings’ art is lighthearted and full of spirit. The characters drawn by him are both diverse and colorful, with designs that contribute to the fun nature of the story. Each face is wildly expressive and helps to make the characters more relatable than they already are. The action scenes are full of bold lines and extravagant color that make the book feel more like a cartoon than sequential art at times. This is by no means a negative, and should lead to the title appealling to a wider audience.

 

 

Power Up #3 marks a major improvement for the series, mostly because everything is finally starting to come together. This is also the strongest issue for the characters, with the supporting cast getting a major chunk of the spotlight. Kate Leth and Matt Cummings have put together a charmingly fun story so far. The six-issue miniseries is halfway through now, but that shouldn’t deter new potential readers. This is a wonderful all ages story that can actually appeal to older audiences as well. Check it out!

BOOM! Studios Writer: Kate Leth Artist: Matt Cummings Price: $3.99       Kate Leth and Matt Cumming’s creator-owned miniseries Power Up is finally started to find its stride with a solid third chapter that is well paced, rewarding, and simply funny.   Leth’s writing is charming as ever, with short lines of dialogue that do just enough to help the story progress and further develop the characters. Amie in particular is still easy to relate with, as someone who just wants to live her life in the way that most young adults seem to desire nowadays. Of course, Amie isn’t the only lovable character. The protagonist is surrounded by a wonderful cast of heroes whom we learn quite a bit about. Kevin’s origin story in particular is very satisfying, despite how short it is, highlighted by a beautifully flashy transformation.     These flashy moments are a huge part of what makes this series so entertaining. Fans of Sailor Moon will find a lot of familiar panels in this book, with plenty of colorful, flashy scenes full of transformations and magical energy. The action scenes are cute and fun to look at, and are mostly entertaining. They don’t progress as smoothly as they could, as there seems to be quite a bit of missed action between the panels, but this doesn’t dramatically hurt the series’ pacing. The villain of this issue has a creative design, and on top of providing some explanation on the circumstances of the characters’ powers, he also serves the purpose of showing the reader how strong Silas the fish actually is (which is very unfortunate for the antagonist).     Matt Cummings’ art is lighthearted and full of spirit. The characters drawn by him are both diverse and colorful, with designs that contribute to the fun nature of the story. Each face is wildly expressive and helps to make the characters more relatable than they already are. The action scenes are full of bold lines and extravagant color that make the book feel more like a cartoon than sequential art at times. This is by no means a negative, and should lead to the title appealling to a wider audience.     Power Up #3 marks a major improvement for the series, mostly because everything is finally starting to come together. This is also the strongest issue for the characters, with the supporting cast getting a major chunk of the spotlight. Kate Leth and Matt Cummings have put together a charmingly fun story so far. The six-issue miniseries is halfway through now, but that shouldn’t deter new potential readers. This is a wonderful all ages story that can actually appeal to older audiences as well. Check it out!
Story - 7
Characters - 8.5
Art - 8

7.8

Power Up #3 is full of wonderful visuals and engaging characters

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