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The Latest Pull

COMIC REVIEW: SUPERMAN: LOIS AND CLARK

DC Comics
Writer: Dan Jurgens
Artist: Lee Weeks
Price: $3.99

 

 

 

Convergence itself was a disappointing event, but some excellent titles came out of the massive multiverse story. One of the best Convergence stories was Convergence: Superman. It was a simple story that showed readers what Clark was willing to do for those that he loves. Flying out of the pages of Convergence: Superman is “Superman: Lois and Clark #1.”

 

Lois and Clark now live alone on a farm with their newborn son, Jon. The theme of the issue is acceptance and the ability to adapt. They are in a strange world that doesn’t seem likely to accept them, but somehow manage to be okay with this through the comfort found in each other. Dan Jurgens writes a strong, heartfelt issue that makes up for the lack of flashy action-sequences. Fans of the Lois and Clark romance will find themselves right at home as they cozy up on a warm couch and read this. That’s how it feels reading Superman: Lois and Clark #1: It’s just a nice, cozy story about family. Those who have read and enjoyed Kurt Busiek’s Superman: Secret Identity will find a lot to love here. This issue has a lot in common with the latter half of Busiek’s classic story about growth and family.

 

A good chunk of the issue highlights Jon, who seems to be oblivious to how cool his father is. The boy begins to grow suspicious though, as his father goes missing more often while extraordinary events are occurring around the globe. Some of the dialogue among the family feels somewhat forced, but for the most part the issue flows well. The issue wouldn’t hold up as well without Jon, and it seems that Jurgens is setting the character up to be the heart of the series soon.

 

Lee Weeks’ art is simple but fantastic, and should not be overlooked. The art has subtle lines and a small amount of detail that doesn’t do anything that really stands out, but just looks flat-out great. The titular couple look wnderful, and the art alone shows the massive amount of love seeping from the panels. This is a book that shows that less can certainly be more when it comes to art. The books don’t need any wild layouts and vivid colors to be beautiful and still avoid looking dark and gritty.

Superman: Lois and Clark #1 is a quiet, beautiful issue once you get past a small but exciting battle in the beginning. There is a lot of heart, and those who like to see superheroes in a believable romance will love what Jurgens has written. Weeks’ art is simple but beautiful, and together this team may have a hit in the future. For now this is a nice and quiet change of pace, despite a few hiccups here and there.

DC Comics Writer: Dan Jurgens Artist: Lee Weeks Price: $3.99       Convergence itself was a disappointing event, but some excellent titles came out of the massive multiverse story. One of the best Convergence stories was Convergence: Superman. It was a simple story that showed readers what Clark was willing to do for those that he loves. Flying out of the pages of Convergence: Superman is "Superman: Lois and Clark #1."   Lois and Clark now live alone on a farm with their newborn son, Jon. The theme of the issue is acceptance and the ability to adapt. They are in a strange world that doesn’t seem likely to accept them, but somehow manage to be okay with this through the comfort found in each other. Dan Jurgens writes a strong, heartfelt issue that makes up for the lack of flashy action-sequences. Fans of the Lois and Clark romance will find themselves right at home as they cozy up on a warm couch and read this. That’s how it feels reading Superman: Lois and Clark #1: It’s just a nice, cozy story about family. Those who have read and enjoyed Kurt Busiek’s Superman: Secret Identity will find a lot to love here. This issue has a lot in common with the latter half of Busiek’s classic story about growth and family.   A good chunk of the issue highlights Jon, who seems to be oblivious to how cool his father is. The boy begins to grow suspicious though, as his father goes missing more often while extraordinary events are occurring around the globe. Some of the dialogue among the family feels somewhat forced, but for the most part the issue flows well. The issue wouldn’t hold up as well without Jon, and it seems that Jurgens is setting the character up to be the heart of the series soon.   Lee Weeks’ art is simple but fantastic, and should not be overlooked. The art has subtle lines and a small amount of detail that doesn’t do anything that really stands out, but just looks flat-out great. The titular couple look wnderful, and the art alone shows the massive amount of love seeping from the panels. This is a book that shows that less can certainly be more when it comes to art. The books don’t need any wild layouts and vivid colors to be beautiful and still avoid looking dark and gritty. Superman: Lois and Clark #1 is a quiet, beautiful issue once you get past a small but exciting battle in the beginning. There is a lot of heart, and those who like to see superheroes in a believable romance will love what Jurgens has written. Weeks’ art is simple but beautiful, and together this team may have a hit in the future. For now this is a nice and quiet change of pace, despite a few hiccups here and there.
Story - 7
Characters - 8.5
Art - 8.3

7.9

Superman: Lois and Clark is a simple and heartfelt story that will make fans of Superman's original love interest smile softly.

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