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The Latest Pull

COMIC REVIEW: SHUTTER #19

Image Comics
Writer: Joe Keatinge
Artist: Leila Del Duca
Price: $3.99

 

Shutter #19

 

 

This month, Joe Keatinge and Leila del Duca take a step back in Shutter to reveal the origins of three of the Kristopher siblings. Shutter #19 feels different than the rest of the series, both in storytelling and in the layout of the panels, but the change in pace doesn’t prevent the issue from still feeling like the rest of the same series that readers have come to love.

The most noteworthy part of Shutter #19 is the panel layout, which explores the backstory of three different characters at different locations over different time periods. Most creators would simply tell one story at a time, ensuring that the reader can properly follow every story without any hiccups or breaks in the pacing. In typical Shutter fashion, the creators’ don’t follow typical practices and tell all three stories at once. On each page for almost the entire chapter, each Kristopher sibling gets one panel to tell a part of their story. A good chunk of the issue also focuses on their father, and his relationship with each of the children.

Shutter #19

The issue takes a few risks with this format, mostly with possibly leading to the readers having a slight disconnect with each character due to not being completely engaged with them, but this isn’t the case. This format actually allows for the stories to take place over a larger period of time without feeling disjointed, due to the fact that the panels aren’t one right after another. The flashbacks aren’t too busy, which both helps and hurts the issue simultaneously. Shutter #19 just wasn’t as exciting as the last few issues, which is somewhat disappointing since the series has been at a high lately, but this issue’s importance can’t be denied.

Shutter #19

Leila del Duca’s art is clean and imaginative as always, but doesn’t appear as strong as it usually does due to the issue’s color scheme. Shutter #19 doesn’t use typical coloring, and instead, each character’s panels have a shade of a color going across the entire panel. Some of the characters and environments don’t pop the way that they usually do, but otherwise the pencil work is just as crisp as it usually is.

Shutter #19

While it isn’t as exciting as the last few issues, Shutter #19 is a vital issue that builds upon the fantastic lore of this series. The final few pages of the issue bring the story back to the present and are nothing short of exciting.

Image Comics Writer: Joe Keatinge Artist: Leila Del Duca Price: $3.99       This month, Joe Keatinge and Leila del Duca take a step back in Shutter to reveal the origins of three of the Kristopher siblings. Shutter #19 feels different than the rest of the series, both in storytelling and in the layout of the panels, but the change in pace doesn’t prevent the issue from still feeling like the rest of the same series that readers have come to love. The most noteworthy part of Shutter #19 is the panel layout, which explores the backstory of three different characters at different locations over different time periods. Most creators would simply tell one story at a time, ensuring that the reader can properly follow every story without any hiccups or breaks in the pacing. In typical Shutter fashion, the creators’ don’t follow typical practices and tell all three stories at once. On each page for almost the entire chapter, each Kristopher sibling gets one panel to tell a part of their story. A good chunk of the issue also focuses on their father, and his relationship with each of the children. The issue takes a few risks with this format, mostly with possibly leading to the readers having a slight disconnect with each character due to not being completely engaged with them, but this isn’t the case. This format actually allows for the stories to take place over a larger period of time without feeling disjointed, due to the fact that the panels aren’t one right after another. The flashbacks aren’t too busy, which both helps and hurts the issue simultaneously. Shutter #19 just wasn’t as exciting as the last few issues, which is somewhat disappointing since the series has been at a high lately, but this issue’s importance can’t be denied. Leila del Duca’s art is clean and imaginative as always, but doesn’t appear as strong as it usually does due to the issue’s color scheme. Shutter #19 doesn’t use typical coloring, and instead, each character’s panels have a shade of a color going across the entire panel. Some of the characters and environments don’t pop the way that they usually do, but otherwise the pencil work is just as crisp as it usually is. While it isn’t as exciting as the last few issues, Shutter #19 is a vital issue that builds upon the fantastic lore of this series. The final few pages of the issue bring the story back to the present and are nothing short of exciting.
Story - 7.8
Characters - 8
Art - 7.8

7.9

Shutter #19 takes a step back to reveal a few things about the past, and mostly succeeds.

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